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Women forge lifelong friendships through unique adventure group

SPOKANE, Wash. - Sharon Dunn stood steady as her chainsaw chewed through a tree branch. 

At 74, she still hasn't let off the gas. 

"You gotta keep moving. If you stop moving, moss is gonna grow on you," Dunn said. 

She joined several other women from Washington, Idaho and Montana Friday as they cleaned up a 20-acre property near Minnehaha Park. The ladies are part of a group called Sisters on the Fly

"We have more fun than anyone," Joi Libsack said. 

Both Libsack and Dunn joined the national group within the past few years. They saw some members camping in their customized and colorful trailers. 

Two sisters started the group in 1999 with the goal of empowering and connecting women, while having some fun outdoors.

More than 12,000 women across the nation comprise the group. That includes more than 100 in the Inland Northwest. 

The organization is good for the community and good for the soul, too. 

Dunn said she joined the sisterhood a few years ago. She was still searching for connections in the years after her husband's death. 

"I needed that. So, it's been great. You get a whole family when you join the sisters," Dunn said. 

Recently, a new philanthropic program grew from the organization. It's called Sister Corps. That began with hurricane relief. Now, local members want to complete their own project.

Bonnie Sherar is leading the effort. She said a Spokane couple left behind their property with the intent that it be left undeveloped.

Sisters on the Fly will clean up the land with the goal that Conservation Futures eventually acquires the land and turn it into a public space for outdoor adventures. 

"It was amazing watching all  these little work bees go after it," Sherar said. 

They planned to work through the weekend. Despite the work load, these ladies haven't forgotten to take time together to sit around the fire and enjoy their sisterhood. 

 

 



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