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Is school funding worth higher taxes? Mead voters will soon decide

Mead school security levy soon to be in the hands of voters
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Mead school security levy soon to be in the hands of voters

MEAD, Wash. - In less than a month, voters in the Mead School District will decide if they want to pay more property taxes to help local schools.

The $14.6 million levy focuses on safety, nurses and more help in the classroom.

If approved, it will cost the average homeowner with a $240,000 house $20 more a month.

"It's just about keeping Mead School District the great place that it is," said Sara Breen, Parent.

Sara Breen not only has kids who go to school in the Mead School District, she also went to Mead High School herself.

"If this levy doesn't get passed, for me personally, I think I would be extremely upset," said Breen.

Breen is invested in these children So much so, she joined the Safety and Security Task Force for the school district.

"I was very motivated after the Parkland shooting last February to find ways that we can actually make changes in our community," said Breen.

Safety and security are just some of the many things the $14.6 million Supplemental Enrichment Levy will go toward.

"This levy would allow us to add some much-needed resources into that area," said Shawn Woodward, Superintendent at Mead School District.

This would include adding a Security Director as well as a Threat Assessment Coordinator.

Another big component of this levy is keeping all the nurses they need on campuses. Right now, the state only pays for one.

"We have 15 school sites right now. One nurse would not be able to cover all of those students of course, said Woodward.

This money will also allow the district to bring back some of the paraeducators they had to lay off a few months back.

"It's one thing when you make cuts in the spring. On paper, it looked pretty difficult and it's proving to be even more difficult once school starts and they're living without some of the resources they had," Woodward said.

Even schools as a whole were cut, including Mead's Alternative High School and Riverpoint Academy.

With this levy, they hope they'll be able to expand on programs for those students.

"It requires not just people that have kids in the system, but the entire community to step up," said Woodward.

"The Mead School District is known for being the best. I know that we are always the best," Breen said.

Ballots will start going out in the mail October 16. The election is on November 5.



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