‘Minuscule amount’ of Radiation found in Spokane milk

‘Minuscule amount’ of Radiation found in Spokane milk
'Minuscule amount' of Radiation found in Spokane milk

During a screening of milk in Spokane a few days ago, the EPA found a ‘minuscule amount’ of iodine-131 in the sample, and officials say there is no public health concern.The EPA has been monitoring milk for signs of radiation as part of its RADNET program and found, on March 25, a sample that contained 0.8 pCi/L of iodine-131, which is more than 5,000 times lower than the derived intervention level set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.The findings, according to the FDA and EPA, are “far below levels of public health concern, including for infants and children. Iodine-131 has a very short half-life of approximately eight days, and the level detected in milk and milk products is therefore expected to drop relatively quickly.””Radiation is all around us in our daily lives, and these findings are a minuscule amount compared to what people experience every day. For example, a person would be exposed to low levels of radiation on a round trip cross country flight, watching television, and even from construction materials,” Patricia Hansen, an FDA senior scientist, said in a joint statement written by the EPA and FDA.Shortly after the EPA and FDA statement was released, Gov. Christine Gregoire issued her own statement, confirming that “Washington milk is safe to drink.” “This morning I spoke with the chief advisers for both the EPA and the FDA and they confirmed that these levels are minuscule and are far below levels of public health concern, including for infants and children,” Gregoire said.”According to them, a pint of milk at these levels would expose an individual to less radiation than would a five-hour airplane flight,” she added.Since the nuclear incident at the Fukushima nuclear complex in Japan, federal agencies including the EPA, FDA and the CDC have been monitoring for signs of radiation across the state.”At no point have detection levels come close to levels of concern,” Gregoire added.