Investigation details conversation between aviators responsible for phallic sky drawings

Investigation details conversation between aviators responsible for phallic sky drawings
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The U.S. Navy confirmed their aircrew was responsible for images of a giant phallus in the sky. 

The Navy Times published a story on Monday detailing the conversations between two junior officers deemed responsible for phallic drawings in the sky in 2017.

The U.S. Navy admitted their aircrew was responsible after people in Okanogan County noticed the unusual drawings.

Investigation details conversation between aviators responsible for phallic sky drawings

RELATED: U.S. Navy admits aircrew drew phallic drawing in sky

“US Navy air crew, flying an F/A-18 Growler (Electronic Attack Aircraft) assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron 130 based at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., flew an air pattern over Okanogan County, Washington, on Thursday, November 16, that left a condensed air trail resembling an obscene image to observers on the ground,” Navy spokesperson Lt. Cmdr. Leslie Hubbell said in 2017.

The story published Monday included records, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, from the Navy’s investigation into the incident. The Navy Times story outlined in detail the lewd conversation between the two officers that led up to the incident.

According to the report, the two junior officers had time to kill and noticed that the white contrails from their jet were “particularly robust” that day.

READ: U.S. Navy issues apology to Okanogan School district over obscene sky drawing

“Draw a giant penis. That would be awesome,” the electronic warfare officer said, according to the Navy Times.

The investigation included the entirety of the conversation between the two, including the realization of what they had done. According to the report, the junior officers noticed the contrails stuck around longer than anticipated and then tried to take steps to obfuscate it.

The Navy Times reported neither lieutenants had previous disciplinary problems and Navy officials originally wanted the two to go before a disciplinary board. However, an investigating officer recommended they receive “non-punitive letters of instruction,” according to the report.

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