Gov. Jay Inslee encourages people to take advantage of vaccine boosters

Washington Requires Covid 19 Vaccination For Teachers, Staff
Ted S. Warren

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee puts on a mask after speaking at a news conference, Wednesday, Aug. 18, 2021, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Inslee announced that Washington state is expanding its vaccine mandate to include all public, charter and private school teachers and staff, as well as those working at the state's colleges and universities. The governor also expanded the statewide indoor mask mandate in place for non-vaccinated individuals to include those who are vaccinated.

OLYMPIA, Wash.– Washington Governor Jay Inslee said he thinks vaccines are the path out of the pandemic and encourages everyone to get the shot.

On Saturday, Gov. Inslee sent out a statement about the COVID-19 vaccine booster expansion eligibility. He said getting the shot is an important step people can take to protect themselves, their friends and their families safe.

“Now that boosters are available to all adults, we hope everyone will take advantage of them,” Inslee said in the statement.

He said he wants to make sure everyone is protected against COVID-19 as they can be with winter right around the corner. He said he wants people to do what they can to prevent another wave of the virus from hitting the state.

“The COVID vaccines continue to amaze me as a scientific success. The vaccine is the path out of the pandemic. I encourage everyone five years and older to get vaccinated – whether you are a child or adult getting their first vaccinate or a 50-year-old getting a booster, we can protect each other with this important step,” Inslee said.

On Friday, the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup confirmed actions taken yesterday by FDA and CDC to recommend boosters for all adults who received their initial course of COVID- 19 vaccine six or more months ago.

The thought of another shot against COVID-19 may feel a bit disheartening, but immunity for some vaccines does wane over time.

“I think one of the things we’re learning as these vaccines are in use, is many different types of vaccines require multiple doses and that’s part of what’s being learned here in real-time,” said Michele Roberts, the Acting Assistant Secretary for the Washington Department of Health (DOH).

Anyone who has received the Johnson and Johnson vaccine at least two months ago should get a booster dose now.

Vaccine types can be mixed, but it’s possible some providers can turn people away for that.

You can find more information on the vaccine and where to find an appointment online.

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