House Bill 7215 is making its way through the Washington Legislature. If it passes, it would create a voluntary alert system for missing native people. The first of its kind across the country.

SPOKANE, Wash– There are 650 missing people in Washington right now. More than 100 are Indigenous people and 14 are from our area.

House Bill 7215 is making its way through the Washington Legislature. If it passes, it would create a voluntary alert system for missing native people. The first of its kind across the country.

Bringing awareness to the issue is a gallery at the Gonzaga University Urban Arts Center. Jeff Ferguson, the guest curator of “Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW): No More Stolen Sisters” is hoping to start conversations.

“If there was something that happened to you, if it was your sister that didn’t come home, you’d want people looking. You’d want people…it’s hard,” he said. “Have a dozen active cases right here in the Spokane area, that’s here and now, not in a land far far away. There is no nimby on this one. This is in our backyard.”

If the bill passes, Ferguson believes it’s a step in the right direction.

“If it’s going to come upon the reader boards, on the interstates? If it’s going to come upon people’s phones like we have now, that is powerful,” he said. “That is a great way to curb this epidemic.”

In the meantime, he’s providing awareness.

“There’s a connection with the people that have been suffering from the loss of their stolen sisters or brothers that they can relate to art and artists,” Ferguson said. “I think it’s an important connection to keep nurturing.”

The art show runs until the end of March.

More information can be found HERE.

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There are 650 missing people in Washington right now. More than 100 are Indigenous people and 14 are from our area.

House Bill 7215 is making its way through the Washington Legislature. If it passes, it would create a voluntary alert system for missing native people. The first of its kind across the country.

Bringing awareness to the issue is a gallery at the Gonzaga University Urban Arts Center. Jeff Ferguson, the guest curator of "Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW): No More Stolen Sisters" is hoping to start conversations.

"If there was something that happened to you, if it was your sister that didn't come home, you'd want people looking. You'd want people...it's hard," he said. "Have a dozen active cases right here in the Spokane area, that's here and now, not in a land far far away. There is no nimby on this one. This is in our backyard."

If the bill passes, Ferguson believes it's a step in the right direction.

"If it's going to come upon the reader boards, on the interstates? If it's going to come upon people's phones like we have now, that is powerful," he said. "That is a great way to curb this epidemic."

In the meantime, he's providing awareness.

"There's a connection with the people that have been suffering from the loss of their stolen sisters or brothers that they can relate to art and artists," Ferguson said. "I think it's an important connection to keep nurturing."

The art show runs until the end of March.

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