Weather

At least 14 potential heat deaths in Oregon after hot spell

Oregon authorities are investigating four additional deaths potentially linked to last week's heat wave, bringing the total number of suspected hyperthermia deaths to 14. The Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office said Monday the designation of heat-related death is preliminary and will require further investigation. The seven-day hot spell in the Pacific Northwest broke heat wave duration records in Portland, Oregon and Seattle. Excessive heat warnings in those cities have been lifted, but the warnings will remain through Monday evening in other parts of northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington state.

Sun, hot & breezy - Mark

Excessive Heat Warning extended to tonight. Fire Weather Warning until Tuesday. One more very hot day with afternoon winds then we start to cool. Afternoon sprinkles and clouds with sunny Tuesday. Cooler for the end of the week then we start warming up again by the weekend.

Hot and dry today, a cool down is coming - Mark

Excessive Heat Warning extended to tonight. One more very hot day then we start to cool. Afternoon sprinkles and clouds with sunny Tuesday. Cooler for the end of the week then we start warming up again by the weekend.

Appalachian cultural center reeling from historic flooding

A cultural center known for chronicling Appalachian life is cleaning up and assessing its losses. Like much of its stricken region, Appalshop has been swamped by historic flooding. The water inundated downtown Whitesburg in southeastern Kentucky, causing extensive damage to the renowned repository of Appalachian history and culture. Some losses are likely permanent, after raging waters soaked or swept away some of Appalshop’s treasure trove of historic material. That includes archives documenting the region's past. Appalshop executive director Alex Gibson says it's “gut-wrenching” to see the damage. But sounding the same note as others in the region, he says Appalshop will recover.

Western flames spread, California sees its largest 2022 fire

Crews battling the largest wildfire so far this year in California braced for thunderstorms and hot, windy conditions that created the potential for more fire growth as they sought to protect remote communities. The McKinney Fire was burning out of control in Northern California’s Klamath National Forest, with thunderstorms a major concern on Sunday. The blaze had grown to more than 80 square miles just two days after erupting in a largely unpopulated area near the Oregon line. In northwest Montana, a blaze sparked in grasslands near the community of Elmo grew to more than 17 square miles after advancing into forest. Crews also are fighting a fire in Idaho.

Seattle, Portland set heat duration records during hot snap

Seattle and Portland, Oregon, set records Sunday for most consecutive days of high temperatures and authorities in Oregon investigated more possible heat-related deaths. In Seattle, the temperature rose to 91 Fahrenheit by early afternoon, the record sixth straight day the mercury rose above 90. In Portland, Oregon, on Sunday temperatures rose above 95 for the seventh day in a row, a record for the city for consecutive days above that mark. In Oregon, the state Medical Examiner’s Office said Sunday it was investigating 10 deaths as possibly heat related. In the Portland area temperatures have risen above 100 several times over the past week.

Infrastructure damage hampers flood recovery in Kentucky

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear says damage to critical infrastructure is hampering efforts to help residents hit by massive flooding. Beshear said Sunday that dozens of bridges were destroyed in last week's floods. That makes it difficult to assist many areas, including those whose water systems were damaged. The governor says communications issues also exist. The National Guard estimates about 400 people have been rescued by helicopter. More heavy rain arrived in the region where the death toll climbed to at least 28 Sunday. The National Weather Service issued flash flood warnings for at least eight eastern Kentucky counties. About 13,000 utility customers in Kentucky remain without power.

Floods strike new blow in place that has known hardship

Some people lost everything in the floods that devastated eastern Kentucky, and many didn't have much to begin with. The rains brought another blow to a region that is among the poorest in America. In a state where coal production has plunged by some 90% since 1990, good jobs have long been hard to come by. Experts say support networks that extended families have built will be important as the region recovers from massive flooding that wiped out homes and businesses and engulfed small towns. But they also say the road to recovery will be long and hard. The death toll stood at 26 on Sunday, and Gov. Andy Beshear says it is expected to rise.

Wildfires in West explode in size amid hot, windy conditions

Wildfires fed by windy and hot conditions have grown dramatically in California and Montana, forcing evacuation orders for over 100 homes. In northern California, the fast-moving McKinney fire tore across an estimated 28 square miles by Saturday morning after starting Friday in Klamath National Forest. California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency Saturday as the fire intensified. Meanwhile in Montana, a wildfire doubled in size to more than 6 square miles near the town of Elmo and Flathead Lake. Roughly 200 miles to the south, Idaho residents remained under evacuation orders as the Moose Fire in the Salmon-Challis National Forest burned more than 67 square miles of timbered land near the town of Salmon.

Dangerous Pacific Northwest heat wave suspected in 7 deaths

Authorities in the Portland, Oregon, region said they would keep cooling shelters open through Sunday night as a heat wave brought scorching weather to the normally temperate region. At least seven people are suspected to have died from hyperthermia since the hot spell began a week ago. Clackamas County officials announced the most recent heat-related death on Saturday, saying an elderly man died in his home where he didn't have a working air conditioner. Jessica Mokert-Shibley, a spokesperson with Multnomah County, said the county would keep overnight cooling centers open through Sunday evening. The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat warning for both the Portland and Seattle, Washington regions lasting through late Sunday evening.

Some Appalachia residents begin cleanup after deadly floods

Some residents of Appalachia are returning to flood-ravaged homes as Kentucky’s governor said search and rescue operations were ongoing in the region swamped by torrential rains days earlier. At least 25 people — including four children — were killed after flash flooding swept through. Rescue crews were continuing the struggle to get into hard-hit areas, some of them among the poorest places in America. In the tiny community of Wayland, Phillip Michael Caudill was working Saturday to clean up mud and debris and salvage what he can from the home he shares with his wife and three children. The waters had receded from the house but left a mess behind along with questions about what his family will do next.

Governor: Search for Kentucky flood victims could take weeks

Kentucky’s governor says it could take weeks to find all the victims of flash flooding that killed at least 16 people when torrential rains swamped towns across Appalachia. More rainstorms are forecast in coming days as rescue crews struggle to get into the hard-hit areas, which include some of the poorest places in America. President Joe Biden declared a federal disaster, seeking to speed relief money to the needy. The flooding is the latest in a string of catastrophic deluges afflicting parts of the U.S. this summer, including St. Louis earlier in the week. Scientists warn that climate change is making weather disasters more common.

Southwest rains flood deserts, cascade into Vegas casinos

The annual weather pattern known as the monsoon has brought a parade of storms to cities across the U.S. Southwest. Las Vegas was hit late Thursday with intense storms that caused water to cascade from ceilings and pool on the carpet of a stadium-sized sports betting area. Forecasters say the pattern may repeat through the weekend. In northern Arizona, Flagstaff residents have grown accustomed to constant alerts on their cell phones and sirens in neighborhoods that warn of imminent flooding. While the rain is welcome, it won't cure the region's drought woes. Reservoirs rely mainly on winter snowpack for replenishment.

Northwest heat wave: Portland mayor warns of risky weekend

The mayor of Portland, Oregon, warned the Pacific Northwest could see the most dangerous part of a multiday heat wave this weekend. Portland and Seattle appear to be on track to break records for extended scorching temperatures. Authorities are investigating whether the heat was to blame for the deaths of at least five people in Oregon. Temperatures have neared the triple digits in Portland the entire week, hitting a high of 102 degrees Fahrenheit (38.9 Celsius) on Tuesday. Forecasters predict temperatures could top 100 F (37.8 C) once again on Saturday.

Governor: Search for Kentucky flood victims could take weeks

Kentucky’s governor said it could take weeks to find all the victims of flash flooding that killed at least 16 people when heavy rains turned streams into torrents that swamped towns across Appalachia. More rainstorms were forecast to roll through in coming days, keeping the region on edge as rescue crews struggled to get into hard-hit areas that include some of the poorest places in America. It’s the latest in a string of catastrophic deluges that have hammered parts of the U.S. this summer, including St. Louis this week. Scientists warn that climate change is making weather disasters more common.

Appalachian flooding deaths set to climb; more rain forecast

Trapped homeowners swam to safety and others were rescued by boat as record flash flooding killed at least 16 people in eastern Kentucky. The deluge swamped entire Appalachian towns and prompted a frenzied search for survivors through some of the poorest communities in America. Officials warned the death toll would likely grow sharply and more rain was forecast in coming days. Entire towns that hug creeks and streams in narrow valleys were swallowed up. It’s the latest in a string of catastrophic deluges that have hammered parts of the U.S. this summer, including St. Louis this week. Scientists warn that climate change is making weather disasters more common.

Friday heat smashes late July records

SPOKANE, Wash.-- At around 2:oo p.m. on Friday, Spokane hit 100° for the second consecutive day. This tied the July 29 record high set in 2014. RELATED: Excessive heat continues through Sunday – Mark This is one of a few…

A very hot weekend is ahead - Mark

The Inland Northwest is in for a very hot weekend. Our triple digit temperatures continue through Sunday with warm nights. This hot weather could make for some wildfires and hazy conditions.…