SPOKANE, Wash. -

If you're someone who works out often, you may be surprised to hear that your workout might not be as intense as you think it is. And your fitness trackers may not be helping much. 

According to a new study by York University in Canada, the majority of people have a broad misunderstanding of how much exercise is needed to maintain good health. 

The study recruited 129 volunteers who were instructed to exercise, then rate the intensity of the workout as either "light," "moderate" or "vigorous."

Despite being given the standards for intensity as defined by Canada's Physical Activity Guide, the study found the volunteers overestimated the intensity of their workouts. 

And a new study out of Iowa State University found your fitness bands may not be tracking your workouts as well as you thought. 

The study looked at eight different fitness trackers and compared their results against a metabolic analyzer for accuracy. 

The results showed most of the bands were not correct when counting the calories actually burned in a workout, though some were more accurate than others. 

The study found the most accurate device was the BodyMedia Fit, followed by the Fitbit Zip and the Fitbit One. 

The study also looked at results of Jawbone Up, ActiGraph, DirectLife, Nike Fuelband and Basis Band.