SPOKANE, Wash. -

A bench was made in honor of a special boy at Browne Elementary School. That bench was destroyed and now a local family is stepping forward in the most remarkable way.

9-year old Brady Johnson loved hockey.
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"He was obsessed with hockey. He collected hockey sticks, tickets to the Chiefs and when he was in the hospital, he would listen to it on the radio," says Brady's mother, Stacy Watson.
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But, it's a game he would never get to play. Much of his life was a battle with spinal muscular atrophy.
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"And so cognitively he was a 100 percent a 9-year-old, but physically he couldn't walk, couldn't lift his arms," says Watson.
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And, couldn't fight common viruses the way other kids could. When Brady was a third-grader at Browne Elementary School, pneumonia was a death sentence.
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"I told him I would take it away in a heart beat if I could. Minutes before he passed, he said 'Mom I got this' and that's something I will never forget," Watson cried.
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While still grieving for their little boy, Brady's friends and family made plans to honor him by raising money for a granite bench. A memorial outside of the school does more than just honor him, it reminded his mom of this community's support.
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"I know if love was enough it would have saved him," said Watson. That very quote is engraved on Brady's bench.
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The day before school started this year, a senseless act--someone destroyed Brady's bench.
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"I was devastated. I don't know how anyone could have done that," said Watson.
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However, this story isn't just about one Browne Elementary School student, it's about two and how their families came together.
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"He was pretty freakin' spectacular," said Andrew Miller. Miller's son, Dereck, was also a student at Browne Elementary.

Dereck is a twin, born prematurely. He suffered from brain damage.

Like Brady two years before, a simple virus took the 10-year old too soon. Also like Brady, Dereck's memory lives on in their old elementary school.
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"The thing about Brady was he was like the pied piper," said Becky Fix, who taught them both and lost them two years apart.
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"Dereck had a terrific sense of humor and was a ferocious reader. To lose third graders in a few years, yeah it was a shock. It was a terrible shock," she said.
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But, she's about to see how those little boys live on through their families. 

"This is something Dereck definitely would have done," said Miller.
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Dereck's family heard about Brady's bench and knew they could help through money raised for the Dereck G. Miller Foundation.
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"People can do such damage, but then other people can come and fix it," said Watson.
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"If we need to buy a whole new one, we will figure it out. Brady is a sweet boy and he deserves it," said Miller.
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"Isn't that the full circle, that's the full circle," said Fix.

A broken bench, healed by two families; both on a journey to repair their own broken hearts.
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"It's two little angels that are working together," said Watson.
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Since the story aired, Greenwood Memorial has reached out to Brady's mother and has also offered to help replace Brady's bench.