COEUR D'ALENE, IDAHO -

The Fedora in Coeur d'Alene served up a Thanksgiving feast for the community for the sixth year Thursday. The best part? It's all free.

The meal is for everyone: those who are in need, people who are alone on the holidays and those who don't feel like cooking. When KXLY got there, the line was wrapped around the building. The Fedora served about 1,700 plates.

Inside the kitchen, the team was hustling to get ready to feed the Lake City community.

“We're just eating Thanksgiving dinner. Our families aren't here and we're two old bachelors, so we're just here having Thanksgiving together,” James Cook said.

But this meal couldn't have happened without the help of about 75 volunteers, many who continue to come back year after year.

“When you're here and see everyone's faces when they're leaving and they just have this real gratefulness for what you've been doing for them, that's just everything,” Caroline Roland, who's volunteered for three years, said.

For many people, Thanksgiving is about remembering what's important.

“I'm thankful for my friends that have stood by me. I had kind of a rough year, too, losing both my parents last year and I've had some really good friends and a lot of support,” Patty Baker said.

Baker celebrated the day with two friends she's know for a while and one new friend who they met at The Fedora.

“I was working all week and so I didn't really get a chance to go home. I'm from New Jersey, so it would've been nice to spend it with my family, but these lovely ladies have invited me. I just met them at the door,” Deborah Masucci said.

With the game on the TV, live music delicious food and no clean up, what better way to spend Thanksgiving?

“It's wonderful. We cam in and they just set the plate down and it was like an instant meal. And it tastes really good,” Janice Coquillard, who was eating with a friend, said.

“It's amazing. We don't have to do the dishes and you get to enjoy all the food,” Baker said.

The only downside?

“Unfortunately, we don't have any leftovers,” Debbie Lohrey said.