Youth Leadership Summit gives students career ideas

Author: Jeff Humphrey, KXLY4 Reporter , jeffhu@kxly.com
Published On: Oct 24 2012 06:30:43 PM PDT
Youth Leadership career fair
SPOKANE VALLEY, Wash. -

From a former F-16 fighter pilot to the head of the Spokane FBI field office and an undefeated MMA fighter, teens listened to speakers talk to different careers at a Rotary Club sponsored Youth Leadership Summit Wednesday in Spokane Valley.

Students watched a reenactment of the Shellye Stark murder case and then heard from the police and prosecutors who took the convicted killer to court; it was a chance for them to see what it would like to pursue a career in law enforcement.

"I think it's really great to interact with the high school students and see that they have direction and motivation and goal," Deputy Prosecutor Tony Hazel said.

Harrington High School student Gabriel Henneman knows money makes the world go around and Wednesday he listened to some good advice on how to get it.

"I'm mostly interested in being financially secure. That's a pretty broad range," he said.

The Liberty Lake Rotary Club sponsors the youth summit and considers the annual event an investment in our area's future.

"Our main goal is to inspire these kids to be good leaders in the future and to give them some good examples, people they can look up to and try to emulate hopefully," Nicki Kopelson with the Liberty Lake Rotary Club said.

The students came away from the summit with a variety of ideas of what to do with their futures.

"What was the message? Leadership, staying strong, fighting your way through things. One of the guys had an injury. He fought his way through it," Odessa High School student Trevor King said.

"Coming here helps start a foundation to know [how] to build a career and get the information you need to further and better your life," Henneman added.

The students headed home with a number of new career ideas, but also a sobering warning that any driving, drug or sex charges they incur as teenagers could hurt their ability to peruse their dream jobs as adults.